Brian Specializes in restorative dentistry which involves rehabilitating damaged, missing, or diseased teeth to restore the functional and cosmetic quality of a person’s dentition.

Restorative and Cosmetic Surgery

Restorative dentistry is a specialized field of dentistry that deals with rehabilitating damaged, missing, or diseased teeth to restore the functional and cosmetic quality of a person’s dentition. Because teeth cannot be restored without considering the health and integrity of the structures and tissues that support them, restorative dentistry is typically an integrative approach which brings together prosthodontic, endodontic, and periodontal treatment.

Implants

A natural tooth has a crown – the part which shows above the gumline, and a root – the anchor hidden below the gumline.

When a tooth is missing, a dental implant takes the place of the missing root and a prosthetic crown replaces the natural crown.

The implant procedure is the same whether one or all teeth are missing. In this example, there is only one missing lower tooth. For the purpose of demonstation we will assume the patient is healthy and is a candidate for this procedure.

Endodontics

To understand endodontic treatment, it helps to know something about the anatomy of the tooth. Inside the tooth, under the white enamel and a hard layer called the dentin, is a soft tissue called the pulp. The pulp contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue and creates the surrounding hard tissues of the tooth during development.

The pulp extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the roots where it connects to the tissues surrounding the root. The pulp is important during a tooth’s growth and development. However, once a tooth is fully mature it can survive without the pulp, because the tooth continues to be nourished by the tissues surrounding it.

Periodontics

Periodontal disease is most often preceded by gingivitis which is a bacterial infection of the gum tissue. A bacterial infection affects the gums when the toxins contained in plaque begin to irritate and inflame the gum tissues. Once this bacterial infection colonizes in the gum pockets between the teeth, it becomes much more difficult to remove and treat. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition that eventually leads to the destruction of the connective tissue and jawbone. If left untreated, it can lead to shifting teeth, loose teeth and eventually tooth loss.